Opportunities

 

This section advertises any vacancies that are open at the Cambridge Centre for Animal Rights Law and informs about other opportunities how to get involved with our work.

Visiting Scholars and Practitioners

The Centre has designated the period mid-January to mid-March each year as its “Collaboration Term”, when academic and practitioner visitors will be invited to Cambridge for some or all of the Cambridge Lent Term to participate in formal events including The Animal Rights Law Lecture, short courses for students and the general public, and informal collaboration.

OPEN NOW: Call for applications for Visitors

The Cambridge Centre for Animal Rights Law invites applications for Visitors to the Centre for a 4–8 week research visit during Cambridge University Lent Term (14 January – 13 March 2020).  

Applicants must either have a PhD or be in the course of completing a PhD, or an equivalent professional qualification. Visitors will be expected to make a contribution to the Centre’s events during the visit, delivering at least two talks and submitting at least one paper for publication.

Applications for the Visitors programme should be sent to Dr Sean Butler by e-mail at scb46@cam.ac.uk. The deadline for applications is 1st October 2019. Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, the names and contact details of two referees, and a 1–2 page description of a research project on some aspect of animal rights law which they intend to work on whilst at the Centre. Our Centre is dedicated to the study and promotion of fundamental rights for nonhuman animals. This means that we are primarily interested in research proposals that explore what a change in animals’ legal status quo would look like (this may include, but is not limited to, explorations of whether animals would cease to be property, whether and which type of legal personhood they would have, which fundamental rights they might possess (and why), or whether they should be given other protections, such as protections of their dignity) and how such change could be achieved. We are therefore less interested in proposals that focus on the current welfare regime that governs animals.

Funding is available up to £2,000 to reimburse the costs of accommodation and travel. Potential applicants are encouraged to discuss the Visitors programme with Executive Director Dr Raffael Fasel by e-mail at rnf22@cam.ac.uk.

A PDF version of the call for applications is available here.

More opportunities

Ways to get involved as a student

The Centre is not part of Cambridge University or the Law Faculty, so we are unable to offer an Animal Rights Law Masters course. However, if you are coming to Cambridge University to take the LLM (or any other course) then you will be able to participate in the work of the Centre:

  • you can attend our two-hourly weekly Animal Rights Law lectures given over eight weeks in the Winter (Michaelmas) Term, October-December;

  • you can participate in our two-hourly fortnightly Animal Rights Law Masters-level seminars given over eight weeks in the Spring (Lent) Term, January-March.

You will be able to participate in discussions, seminars, and workshops, and also attend our annual keynote Talk on Animal Rights Law, and work with us on an agreed research topic in the field of animal rights law to produce a paper for publication. There is no cost for attending the lectures or seminars.

Ways to get involved as a self-funded Visitor or Research Associate

Even when we have no vacancy for a funded Visitor or Research Associate position at our Centre, it is always possible to apply to join our Centre as a self-funded Visitor or Research Associate:

  • Self-funded Visitors will join the Centre for a 4–8 week research visit during Cambridge University Lent Term (14 January – 13 March 2020) and work on a proposed research project;

  • Self-funded Research Associates will work at the Centre for a period of 12 months or more, normally with a specific focus in the key overall areas (jurisprudence, public international law/conventions, animal/human rights law, policy) and the key operational areas (farmed animals, zoo animals, laboratory animals, domesticated animals, and wild animals).

In each case, successful applicants will participate in discussions, seminars, and workshops, and also attend our annual keynote Talk on Animal Rights Law, and work with us on an agreed research topic in the field of animal rights law to produce a paper for publication. Please note that our Centre is dedicated to the study and promotion of fundamental rights for nonhuman animals. This means that we are primarily interested in research proposals that explore what a change in animals’ legal status quo would look like (this may include, but is not limited to, explorations of whether animals would cease to be property, whether and which type of legal personhood they would have, which fundamental rights they might possess (and why), or whether they should be given other protections, such as protections of their dignity) and how such change could be achieved. We are therefore less interested in proposals that focus on the current welfare regime that governs animals.

There is a fee for those coming as self-funded Visitors or Research Associates (but bursaries may be available to cover some of the costs).

Applications for self-funded Visitor or Research Associate visits should be sent to Dr Sean Butler by e-mail at scb46@cam.ac.uk. There is no deadline for applications, but we particularly welcome applications that reach us by the beginning of October. Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, and a 1–2 page description of a research project on some aspect of animal rights law which they intend to work on whilst at the Centre. Applicants should also provide the names and contact details of two referees. Potential applicants are encouraged to discuss their interest with Executive Director Dr Raffael Fasel by e-mail at rnf22@cam.ac.uk.